Sugar Tax: UK government's sugar tax comes into effect

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A Co-op spokeswoman told ITV: "The levy is created to be passed onto customers and drive a change in consumer behaviour so, for branded soft drinks that do qualify, we will pass on the cost of the levy and the Value-Added Tax".

The move aims to help tackle childhood obesity.

The UK's sugar tax, or soft drinks levy, comes into force today meaning manufacturers will be forced to reformulate or pay an extra levy on high sugar beverages.

Dr Pepper will have a slashed sugar content because of the new tax.

Jenvrik also confirmed that the government is already looking to sugary milk-based drinks, like milkshakes, and may start taxing them if companies don't match targets and cut their sugar content by a fifth before 2020.

"That said, there are clear health benefits to the whole population if we are all able to reduce the amount of free sugar in our diet".

Scotland's iconic drink announced a change in recipe a year ago in response to the sugar tax.

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"A war is being waged against sugar by the government and the media", said Emma Clifford, associate director of food & drink at Mintel.

The amount each brand goes up by depends on the amount of sugar in the drink.

Benedict Jephcote, Editor of Diabetes.co.uk, said: "Sugary drinks are undoubtedly popular for their taste, but we know that the benefits of the taste come with a very significant downside in terms of health".

The delayed introduction of the sugar tax is still not sufficient to give firms adequate time to prepare, a senior tax expert has claimed. Lastly, an expected revenue of £240m ($340) is expected to be raked by the government - that money will be invested in schools sports and breakfast clubs. They will get healthier too.

Under the levy, the cost of producing a standard can of Coca Cola will increase by 8p, while a pint of a soft drink subject to the higher band served in a pub or restaurant will increase by 14p.

So how will it affect you, and the soft drinks you buy? It is believed manufacturers of soft drinks which contain more than five grams of sugar per 100ml will have to pay 18p per litre to the Treasury.

A Co-op spokeswoman said: "The levy is created to be passed onto customers and drive a change in consumer behaviour so, for branded soft drinks that do qualify, we will pass on the cost of the levy and the Value-Added Tax".

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